Bobby Clarke

Founder/CEO of Irie Jam Radio

Jamaica-born, New York resident Robert “Bobby” Clarke, is president and CEO of Queens-based Irie Jam Radio. In 2017 he was honored by the Jamaican government with the sixth-highest honor in the island’s Orders of Societies of Honor, the prestigious Order of Distinction, “for over 20 years of dedicated media services to Jamaican nationals of the New York Tri-state area”.

Through clever collaboration with some of Jamaica’s most brilliant broadcast professionals, Clarke’s first step into media began in the 1990s with an unprecedented all-reggae format of broadcasting Jamaica based IRIE FM on New York airwaves using ISBN lines, which had just come on the market. Later evolving into slotted programs on additional radio stations, Irie Jam now broadcasts 47 hours per week, 7 days a week on WVIP — its dancehall, roots reggae and soca playlist supplemented by extended infomercial styled interviews with businesses targeting the vast purchasing power of the station’s Caribbean-American listenership.

Irie Jam’s popular lineup of radio personalities includes Calvin “Cali B” Barrett, Chris “Dubbmaster” McDonald, Jabba (of Bobby Konders’ Massive B sound, heard on New York City’s WQHT FM Hot 97), Marcus Wanted (of Platinum Kids sound), Roy “DJ Roy” Walters (of Road International sound) and Irwine Clare, who helms Irie Jam’s talk programs addressing issues and interests of the Caribbean community. The IRIE Jam executive team today consists of Louis Grant, Michael Williams and Syntyché Clarke (Bobby’s wife).

Just as they introduced cutting edge simulcasts from Jamaica to the New York market in 1993, Irie recently launched another technological breakthrough: Irie Jam 360, an audio/visual interactive app, powered by Radio Vue technology. Through Irie Jam 360 you can watch Irie Jam radio live from Irie Jam studios across social media platforms. Listeners can call in via Skype to talk to our DJs, post messages onscreen and chat on a split screen, which is integral to pulling artists into the conversation. Basically, it turns a radio station into a TV station.